Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs

Diane Singerman ─ Why Did the Revolution Stop at the Municipal Level? Local Politics, Urbanism, and Revolution in Egypt

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

5 p.m.

McKinney Conference Room

Diane Singerman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Government, and Co-Director of Middle East Studies at American University.

Professor Singerman is a comparativist whose research interests focus on political change from below, particularly in the Middle East, and more specifically Egypt. Her work examines the formal and informal side of politics, gender, social movements, globalization, public space, protest, and urban politics. Her most recent edited books are Cairo Contested: Governance, Urban Space, and Global Modernity, and Cairo Cosmopolitan: Politics, Culture, and Urban Space in the New Globalized Middle East. 

Professor Singerman is also the Co-Director and Co-Founder of Middle East Studies @ American University. She is currently working on a project funded by the Ford Foundation called "Tadamun: The Cairo Urban Solidarity Initiative," which aims to research, publicize and promote ways that communities in Cairo can mobilize to improve their neighborhoods, reform local government, and redefine their role in the public sphere. See www.tadamun.info for more detail.

 

Development and Governance Seminar