Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs

Art at Watson Exhibit Opening: Lois Raimondo ─ Fractured Spaces: Stories of Resistance and Resilience

Monday, February 13, 2017

4 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Joukowsky Forum

The exhibit's opening reception will follow the talk.

Lois Raimondo will discuss Fractured Spaces: Stories of Resistance and Resilience and lead a tour of the exhibit. The discussion will be followed by an opening reception at 5 p.m.

Fractured Spaces: Stories of Resistance and Resilience is a three-part photo exhibit focusing on communities disrupted and dislocated by political and cultural conflict: Iraqis living with daily bombings, IED attacks, and the dismantling of their country’s infrastructure; Afghan Northern Alliance soldiers, exiles at home, seizing the military moment to take back their country from the Taliban and defending remote, isolated mountain peaks; 90,000 Tibetans living as political refugees in the Himalayan foothills of Dharamsala, India, with their leader, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, and striving to maintain core pieces of the Tibetan culture they left behind when they fled their homeland five decades earlier; and a small group of Pakistani women, so-called “social corruption bombs,” locked together in a government safe house for “endangered women and children.” These situations are radically different in detail and texture, but each paints a layered portrait of human resilience.

Produced with generous support from the Brown Arts Initiative.

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Art at Watson

Lois Raimondo’s first journalism job was as a translator for CBS News during President Reagan’s 1984 trip to China. At the time, she was a student living in a small Chinese village collecting folktales for a master’s degree in comparative literature from Indiana University. Later, as a journalist, she reported primarily from China, Tibet, India, and Vietnam. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, National Geographic, TIME, Newsweek, Paris Match, Stern, Smithsonian Magazine, and many other publications. More recently, Raimondo worked for 10 years as a staff photographer at the Washington Post. She is currently the Shott Chair in Journalism at the West Virginia University’s Reed College of Media.

Raimondo has received honors as both a reporter and a photographer, and has been recognized for her ability to create narrative on multiple platforms. Her frontline reporting from the war in Afghanistan was recognized with the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting. While at New York Newsday, she was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for her investigative reporting on corruption in New York’s Mitchell-Lama Housing Program. She received an Alicia Patterson Fellowship to support her work on the rise of Islamic fundamentalism in Waziristan.