Middle East Studies

Shamiran Mako

Director of Undergraduate Studies

Department: Middle East Studies

shamiran_mako@brown.edu

Dr. Shamiran Mako is a political scientist with expertise on the comparative politics and international relations of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA region). Her research focuses on state formation, authoritarianism, civil wars, democratization, post-conflict state and peacebuilding, revolutions and social movements, ethnic conflict and identity politics. She is currently working on two book projects. The first traces the institutional legacies of ethnic conflict in Iraq and analyzes the effects of structural and institutional constraints on the mobilization calculous of communal groups throughout formative statebuilding periods. The second project is a co-authored book with Professor Valentine Moghadam of Northeastern University that explains divergent outcomes of the Arab Uprisings. The book examines the socio-economic and political dynamics that have shaped the trajectory of progress and stagnation across seven MENA-region country case studies.

Dr. Mako obtained her Ph.D. from the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Edinburgh. From 2014-2015, she was a Research Associate at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University and a Carnegie Visiting Scholar at the Boston Consortium for Arab Region Studies. From 2015-2017, she was a Lecturer at the International Affairs Program at Northeastern University where she taught courses on Middle East Studies and the Arab Spring.

Dr. Mako is the co-editor of a newly released book titled State and Society in Iraq: Citizenship under Occupation, Dictatorship and Democratization (I.B. Tauris, Winter 2017) as well as the author of “Cultural Genocide and Key International Instruments: Framing the Indigenous Experience,” International Journal of Minority and Group Rights. Vol. 19 (June 2012). She is a co-author, with Hannibal Travis, of “The Right of Return in Iraq: Conceptualizing Insecurity, State Fragility and Forced Displacement,” in Transitional Justice and Forced Migration: Critical Perspectives from the Global South forthcoming with Cambridge University Press, Winter 2018 and a co-author, with Marc Lemieux, of “Political Parties, Elections and the Transformation of Iraqi Politics since 2003,” in State and SocietyIraq: Negotiating Citizenship under Occupation, Authoritarianism and Democratization.