Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs

"Beatrice," from I Married the Man Who Killed My Family, a collection of photographs taken in Rwanda in the summer of 2013 by Emily Kassie '14. The series explores the phenomenon of intermarriage between families of victims and perpetrators of the 1994 Genocide.

Even before Richard M. Locke was officially director of the Watson Institute, he had a vision for the place: that it convey a clear mission and distinct research areas, that it add top new scholars and practitioners to its ranks, that it become well known across campus – and that it come alive.

Even before Richard M. Locke was officially director of the Watson Institute, he had a vision for the place: that it convey a clear mission and distinct research areas, that it add top new scholars and practitioners to its ranks, that it become well known across campus – and that it come alive.

By September, student art began to appear on all three floors. The works are related to international themes, and include projects about child mental illness in Ghana, emerging identities resulting from the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda (above), and realities of the global textile industry.

Then, on November 19, Watson hosted its first opening to mark the exhibit of works by Professor of History Emeritus Abbott “Tom” Gleason. “Abbott Gleason Pictures: 1961 – 2013” comprises some 25 oil paintings and pastels, the majority of them produced since Gleason was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease, in 2004.

Art at Watson is a new initiative that showcases works by student, faculty, and staff from Brown, as well as by artists from the broader community. Contact watson_institute@brown.edu for more information.