Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs

Cristina García and Dariel Suarez – Writing For a Broken World

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Pembroke Hall, Room 305, 172 Meeting Street

Reception and book signing to follow

Contemporary novelists Cristina García and Dariel Suarez use fiction to capture what life after the Cuban Revolution has meant for both Cubans on the island and Cuban-Americans. With great pathos, humor, and anguish, their unforgettable characters show us what’s at stake for individuals in the love and loss of nation, the love and loss of each other, and the pain and promise of exile. This event brings together García and Suarez for readings of their work and a discussion with the audience.

Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Cristina García was born in Havana, Cuba. In 1961, when she was two years old, her family was among the first wave of people to flee Cuba after Fidel Castro came to power. They settled in New York City where she was raised in Queens, Brooklyn Heights, and Manhattan. She is the author of seven novels: Here in BerlinKing of CubaThe Lady Matador’s HotelA Handbook to LuckMonkey HuntingThe Agüero Sisters, winner of the JanetHeidiger Kafka Prize; and Dreaming in Cuban, finalist for the National Book Award. Garcí­a has edited two anthologies, Bordering Fires: The Vintage Book of Contemporary Mexican and Chicano/a Literature and Cubaní­simo: The Vintage Book of Contemporary Cuban Literature. She is also the author of three works for young readers, Dreams of Significant GirlsThe Dog Who Loved the Moon; and I Wanna Be Your Shoebox. A collection of poetry, The Lesser Tragedy of Death, was published in 2010. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Hodder Fellowship at Princeton University, and an NEA grant, among others. García has taught at universities nationwide. Currently, García is playwright-in-residence at the Brava Theater Center in San Francisco.

Dariel Suarez was born and raised in Havana, Cuba. He immigrated to the United States with his family in 1997, during the island’s economic crisis known as The Special Period. He is the author of the novel The Playwright’s House (forthcoming, Red Hen Press) and the story collection A Kind of Solitude (Willow Springs Books), winner of the 2017 Spokane Prize for Short Fiction. Dariel is an inaugural City of Boston Artist Fellow and the Director of Core Programs and Faculty at GrubStreet, the country’s largest independent creative writing center. His prose has appeared or is forthcoming in numerous publications, including The Kenyon ReviewMichigan Quarterly ReviewPrairie SchoonerThe Massachusetts ReviewNorth American ReviewThird CoastSouthern Humanities Review, WBUR’s Cognoscenti, and The Caribbean Writer, where his work was awarded the First Lady Cecile de Jongh Literary Prize. Dariel earned his M.F.A. in Fiction at Boston University and now resides in the Boston area with his wife and daughter.