Watson Institute at Brown University
International Relations
Adam C. Levine, MD, MPH

Adam C. Levine, MD, MPH

Adam C. Levine, MD, MPH

Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine

Areas of Interest: Professionalization of humanitarian response, trauma and injury management, epidemic response and preparedness, Ebola Virus Disease, cholera and severe diarrheal disease, management of childhood illness and development of emergency care systems in resource-limited settings.

Biography

Dr. Adam Levine is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Director of the Division of Global Emergency Medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. He received his Medical Doctorate from the University of California, San Francisco and his Masters of Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley before completing his specialty training in Emergency Medicine at the Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency in Boston.

In recent years, Dr. Levine has responded to humanitarian emergencies in Haiti, Libya, South Sudan, and Liberia and has led research and training initiatives in South Asia, East Africa, and West Africa. He currently serves as the Director for the Humanitarian Innovation Initiative at Brown University, whose goals are to improve the quality and professionalize the delivery of humanitarian assistance worldwide, and as the Primary Investigator for the Global Emergency Response and Recovery Project for International Medical Corps, focused on improving international and local capacity for responding to future epidemics and pandemics. He also serves as Editor-in-chief for Academic Emergency Medicine's annual Global Emergency Medicine Literature Review. His own NIH and foundation-funded research focuses on improving the delivery of emergency care in resource-limited settings and during humanitarian emergencies.

Research

  1. Cholera Management: Accurate and rapid assessment of dehydration status is critical to preventing morbidity and mortality in patients with cholera, yet the tools available to providers for diagnosing dehydration are limited. With funding support from the NIH Fogarty International Center, I conducted a series of studies in Rwanda and Bangladesh focusing on the development of new tools for the assessment of dehydration in young children with acute diarrhea. In addition to deriving and validating the DHAKA score, a new clinical diagnostic tool for the assessment of dehydration in young children, my research also explored the accuracy of other clinical diagnostic models for dehydration, as well as the interaction between malnutrition and acute diarrheal disease.

  2. Ebola Virus Disease: From 2015-2016, I directed International Medical Corps’ Ebola Research Team, leading a series of retrospective and prospective studies in West Africa. Our research has led to the development of new tools that front-line health workers can use to predict which patients are most likely to have EVD in the context of an epidemic, as well as expanding our understanding of the natural history of this deadly disease.

  3. Improved Diagnostics for Global Health: I have carried out a series of studies investigating the novel use of cost-effective diagnostic technologies for managing the most common causes of death in children and adults worldwide. This includes several studies on the use of handheld, portable ultrasound for the assessment of dehydration in children with diarrhea, as well as the use of oxygen saturation for predicting pneumonia, and biosensor patches for monitoring vital signs in patients with Ebola. Improved diagnostics can help clinicians in resource-limited settings provide the effective care for patients while limiting the overuse of precious health care resources.

  4. Trauma Management in Austere Settings: I have conducted prior research on the management of traumatic injuries, both in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa and during humanitarian emergencies. My research has focused both on understanding the burden of injury in these contexts, as well as developing novel methods for improving the delivery of care to patients across the globe suffering from acute injuries.

Publications

  1. Bilal S, Nelson E, Meisner L, AlamM, Al AminSU, AshenafiY, Teegala S, Khan MA, AlamNH, Levine AC. “Evaluation of standard and mobile health (mHealth)-supported clinical diagnostic tools for assessing dehydration in patients with diarrhea in rural Bangladesh.” American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2018.
  2. Skrable K, Bilal S, Sharma R, Robertson S, Ashenafi Y, Nasrin S, Alam NH, Levine AC. “The effects of malnutrition and diarrhea type on the accuracy of clinical signs of dehydration in children under five: A prospective cohort study in Bangladesh.” American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2017. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0277
  3. Skrable K*, Roshania R*, Mallow M, Wolfman V, Siakor M, Levine AC. “The Natural History of Ebola Virus Disease among Patients Managed in Five Ebola Treatment Units in West Africa.” PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2017; 11(7): e0005700. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005700
  4. Waxman M, Aluisio AR, Rege S, Levine AC. “Baseline Characteristics and Survival of Patients Infected with Malaria and Ebola Virus in Sierra Leone.” Lancet Infectious Diseases, 2017. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30112-3.
  5. Aluisio AR, Teicher C, Wiskel T, Guy A, Levine AC. “Focused Training for Humanitarian Responders in Regional Anesthesia Techniques for a Planned Randomized Controlled Trial in a Disaster Setting.” PLOS Currents Disasters, 2016. doi:10.1371/currents.dis.e75f9f9d977ac8adededb381e3948a04.
  6. Lamontagne F, Fowler RA, Adhikari NK, Murthy S, Brett-Major DM, Jacobs M, Uyeki TM, Vallenas C, Norris SL, Fischer WA, Fletcher TE, Levine AC, Reed P, Bausch DG, Gove S, Hall A, Shepherd S, Siemieniuk R, Lamah MC, Kamara R, Nakyeyune P, Soka MJ, Edwin A, Hazzan AA, Jacob ST, Elkarsany MM, Adachi T, Benhadj L, Clément C, Crozier I, Garcia A, Hoffman SJ, Guyatt GH. “Evidence-based guidelines for supportive care of patients with Ebola virus disease.” Lancet, 2017.
  7. Balhara KS, Silvestri DM, Winders WT, Selvam A, Kivlehan SM, Becker TK, Levine AC on behalf of the Global Emergency Medicine Literature Review (GEMLR). “Impact of nutrition interventions on pediatric mortality and nutrition outcomes in humanitarian emergencies: A systematic review.” Tropical Medicine & International Health, 2017. doi: 10.1111/tmi.12986
  8. Henwood PC, Bebell LM, Roshania R, Wolfman V, Mallow M, Kalyanpur A, Levine AC. “Ebola Virus Disease in Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study of Patients Managed at Five Ebola Treatment Units in West Africa.” Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2017; doi: 10.1093/cid/cix290.
  9. Steinhubl SR, Faye D, Levine AC, Conkright C, Wegerich SW, Conkright G. “Validation of a Portable, Deployable System for Continuous Vital Sign Monitoring Using a Multi-Parametric Wearable Sensor and Personalized Analytics in an Ebola Treatment Center.” BMJ Global Health 2016;1:e000070.
  10. Levine AC, Glavis-Bloom J, Modi P, Nasrin S, Atika B, Rege S, Robertson S, Schmid CH, Alam NH. “External Validation of the DHAKA score and comparison to the current IMCI algorithm for the assessment of dehydration in children with diarrhoea.” Lancet Glob Health. 2016 Oct; 4(10): e744–e751. PMC5066390.

Teaching

Brown University PHP 1802S: Human Security and Humanitarian Response
Spring Semester Seminar Course
16 classes – 41 students

Brown International Advanced Research Institutes
Co-Convener for Institute on Social Entrepreneurship in Health and Humanitarian Innovation
2 week course – 35 international students in attendance